It’s easy to forget how much food affects our mood and overall health, especially this time of year. If you’re feeling under the weather, try making immune-boosting salads like this one. Fennel is loaded with vitamin K, making this celery-like, licorice-tasting vegetable amazing for bone health, with other vitamins and minerals working to prevent inflammation, high blood pressure, cancer, and more. And thanks to the vitamin C in both fennel and orange, this simple salad is as functional as it is tasty.

We need to eat a variety of vegetables every day for disease prevention, weight control, hormonal/thyroid balance, and optimal health. And while nothing can substitute for healthy, whole foods like this, we all need a little help from supplements to help fill the nutrient gaps in our diets.

This post is adapted from an original article from Food52.


Photo by James Ransom via Food52

MOLLY STEVENS’ ROASTED FENNEL, RED ONION, AND ORANGE SALAD

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 large or 2 small fennel bulbs (about 1 pound untrimmed)
  • 1 medium red onion
  • 1 small navel orange, scrubbed
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Directions

  1. Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat to 400 degrees F (375 degrees convection). Line a heavy-duty rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper (this prevents the oranges from sticking to the pan).
  2. Cut fennel bulbs crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick crescent-shaped slices.
  3. Cut the onion into 1/4-inch-thick half-moons and add to the fennel.
  4. Next, slice about 1 1/2 inches off each end of the orange and reserve (you’ll use these later to squeeze over the salad). Cut the orange lengthwise in half, and then cut each half lengthwise in half again, leaving you with 4 pieces. Arrange each quarter with cut side down and slice crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick quarter-moon-shaped pieces.
  5. Add the orange to the fennel and onion. Drizzle the olive oil on top and season well with salt and plenty of pepper. Toss to coat and arrange as best you can in an even layer on the baking sheet.
  6. Roast, stirring with a spatula after 15 minutes to ensure even cooking and again every 10 minutes or so. Continue roasting until the vegetables and orange are tender and the outer edges are beginning to caramelize, 25 to 45 minutes.
  7. Transfer to a serving dish. Let cool for at least 15 minutes or to room temperature. Squeeze the juice from one of the reserved orange ends over the salad and taste. If it tastes a little flat, add a pinch of salt and squeeze the other orange piece over it. Drizzle with a little of your best olive oil and serve warm or at room temperature.

Nutritional deficiencies aren’t just a thing of the past. We’re constantly exposed to toxins in our food and environment that can pose a real threat to our body’s ability to absorb nutrients. Signs of deficiency show up as digestion problems, memory impairment, low energy levels, metabolism, etc. and should not be ignored. Our functional medicine programs are designed to take a comprehensive look at your individual needs to equip you with the supplements you need to get back on track to the healthiest version of yourself. Book a free consultation with us today!

Blood Lab and Health Assessment